Each year volunteers come to Nangi from all over the world to teach English and other subjects at the school. In a joint effort by University of Vic in Spain and Bath Spa University in England, several students and two professors were in Nangi in April 2013. Below is an account by the Spanish professor Marta. Come back next month and read what the professor from England had to say.

“My Name is Marta. I am a professor and lecturer of the University of Vic. Vic is a small city situated north of Barcelona (Catalonia). Last April, I had the opportunity to be in Nangi with six of my students. An experience none of us is ever going to forget. The openness, warmth and dedication of the people in Nangi made our stay a very pleasant one.”

 

Teachers Chandra and Toya reading students' work: Let's check our work: did we write the proper information?
Teachers Chandra and Toya reading students’ work: Let’s check our work: did we write the proper information?
The teachers reading a text on the wall will act as messengers by reading and memorizing while the secretaries are in class ready to write the message down.
The teachers reading a text on the wall will act as messengers by reading and memorizing while the secretaries are in class ready to write the message down.

“I felt very privileged, as I was given the chance to give a workshop about “Teaching English as a foreign language” for the teachers in Nangi. Moreover, it was a workshop in which my students could also participate. It took two days and we shared our activities with several teachers of Himanchal High School and other schools around the village. We learned and had fun, we discovered similarities and differences in the way we approach a foreign language. English, Nepalese and Catalan were present in our sessions. Being a language teacher, it was great to be immersed in such a rich context linguistically speaking.”

 

Two teachers playing a game and decide whose turn it is. The student won. Using games encourages English speaking skills.
Two teachers playing a game and decide whose turn it is. The student won. Using games encourages English speaking skills.

“I was impressed with the creativity Nepalese people show when talking about ideas to teach children and young people. This took me back fourteen years ago, when I was teaching in Sanothimi Campus, in Bhaktapur. Then, I often asked myself this question: “What do Nepalese people do so well as to be able to be so creative? I would like to know and take this home with me”. Fourteen years later, I still don’t know the answer to this question. Fortunately, it is still a mystery to me and I know I’ll have to go back to Nepal again to find out more about it. This way, I’ll feel the spirit, the enthusiasm and the uniqueness of Nepalese teachers, again.”

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